Shakespeare · Uncategorized · Walking · Writing

Lockdown Walking in Macbeth

  Walking. Now, I may be on to something here, because everyone is talking about walking. “The coronavirus lockdown has changed my relationship to walking” says journalist Cazz Blase, for whom this new delight in perambulation is aided by the reduction in traffic. Walking used to be something we just ‘did’; a functional necessity to… Continue reading Lockdown Walking in Macbeth

Uncategorized

“But first I must feel it as a reader…”

T.S. Eliot argued, in his 1929 essay on Dante’s poetry, that “all poetry communicates before it is understood”. One way of interpreting this is to see that there is an instant emotive, perhaps even visceral, response to reading a text that precedes the more considered analytical, cerebral one that gives it deeper significance. Eliot’s quotation… Continue reading “But first I must feel it as a reader…”

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde · Uncategorized

Jekyll and Hyde in 4 Things …

This series of blog posts is inspired by some of the work I have been doing on my PhD and in particular Andrea Arnold’s film version of Wuthering Heights. I have just finished reading a chapter from a book by Deborah Lutz called ‘The Bronte Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects”, a chapter which describes the Bronte’s fascination with… Continue reading Jekyll and Hyde in 4 Things …

Uncategorized

Comparing Nineteenth century fiction with Contemporary Young Adult fiction

  Images: http://www.gramunion.com/monamay.tumblr.com/149125847167; https://mattbredmond.com/2012/01/20/the-house-of-truth-and-the-hearth-of-kindness/   Studying 19th century fiction is also an exciting exploration of changing styles, contexts, characters and narrative trajectories. Take the following two extracts. The first from Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte’s bildungsroman charting the development of the eponymous protagonist as she negotiates her way through various residences, relationships and revelations. The second is… Continue reading Comparing Nineteenth century fiction with Contemporary Young Adult fiction

Uncategorized

Of Windows and (Imaginary) Walking in Jane Eyre

Men in 19th century literature like walking. For some, like Wordsworth, it was not only a spur to prick the sides of his imaginative intent, but also a tactile reaction to the creeping industrialisation that took humans further each day away from nature; for others, like some of Charles Dickens’ characters, they walked because they… Continue reading Of Windows and (Imaginary) Walking in Jane Eyre