Shakespeare · Uncategorized · Walking · Writing

Lockdown Walking in Macbeth

  Walking. Now, I may be on to something here, because everyone is talking about walking. “The coronavirus lockdown has changed my relationship to walking” says journalist Cazz Blase, for whom this new delight in perambulation is aided by the reduction in traffic. Walking used to be something we just ‘did’; a functional necessity to… Continue reading Lockdown Walking in Macbeth

literature · Other stuff · Walking

Frankenstein, urban walking and the uncanny.

In the last blog, I wrote about the connections between walking and nature in Frankenstein. On the one hand, there are the rational, Romantic imaginations of Victor and Clerval who observe and document the landscape to present it to the reader as if they were viewing the scene through a cinema screen; on the other… Continue reading Frankenstein, urban walking and the uncanny.

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“But first I must feel it as a reader…”

T.S. Eliot argued, in his 1929 essay on Dante’s poetry, that “all poetry communicates before it is understood”. One way of interpreting this is to see that there is an instant emotive, perhaps even visceral, response to reading a text that precedes the more considered analytical, cerebral one that gives it deeper significance. Eliot’s quotation… Continue reading “But first I must feel it as a reader…”

literature · Walking

Frankenstein: walking with mind and with body

(Bibliothèque de Genève) In the last blog, I wrote about the ‘walking continuum’ on which we can position the variety of perambulatory experiences described in literature. At the one end of this continuum is the purely observational walk: the walk that acts as a sort of mobile camera through which readers can see through the… Continue reading Frankenstein: walking with mind and with body

literature · Other stuff · Walking

The sensation of walking: a preface to observations on Walking in Frankenstein…

In the last blog, I discussed the links between walking and death in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. This was the first in a series of blogs examining walking in the novel, and I want to move on to how, in the novel, Mary Shelley is able to shift between walking as observational and as experience. Before… Continue reading The sensation of walking: a preface to observations on Walking in Frankenstein…